4 Foolproof Tips To Asking For & Getting The Raise You Deserve

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blackwoman-whitewoman-officeAsking for a raise is not always an easy task for most women on the job. More times than not, many women in the workplace would prefer to not rock the boat by seeking more than what is already being provided to them in terms of salary. Maybe it is the fear of rejection, or the fear of retaliation by an employer for seeking additional income that keep many from inquiring. Whatever the case may be, as an employee, the conversation with your supervisors or human resource department needs to take place at some point during your tenure with your company as it has been proven that the success rate for a raise request is not as low as some employees may think it is.

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According to Accenture’s Career Capital 2014 Global Research Results, more than three-fourths (77%) of employees who have asked for or negotiated a pay raise have received one. The survey conducted by Accenture sought such information from 4,100 professionals in 32 countries. More than two-thirds (68%) of professionals who have asked for a promotion have received one.

Well, what does this mean?

All working women should take this study’s findings as a cue to put away fears that may hinder the procurement of more finances. Develop and execute a plan that may yield optimal results in your requests, which may include the following:

1) Ask at the right time.

Personalities, time of the day, and mode of correspondence all may yield either a positive or negative result, depending on a slew of variables. If your boss is not a morning person, or hates to communicate via email, then sending them an email when they first walk in the door may get your request shut down or not acknowledged at all.

2) Be knowledgeable.

You should prepare to ask for a raise based upon comparable salaries of those working in the same industry and for the amount of years you have worked as well. Websites such as Monster.com and Salary.com are great sites to commence the search for such information.

3) Highlight your accomplishments.

Be certain and prepare to bring up and discuss all of the positive contributions you have made to the company. Quantifying results may aid the powers to be in their consideration of your request.

4) Decide what’s next.

Do you know how you will react if your request is denied? Are you prepared to seek new employment or are you prepared to work harder for a more favorable result?

Overall, make a plan and see it through if you believe you have adequately positioned yourself for a raise. Do not be afraid to ask, as it has been proven that positive responses have come to those who actually asked.

Rashida Maples, Esq. is Founder and Managing Partner of J. Maples & Associates (www.jmaplesandassociates.com . She has practiced Entertainment, Real Estate and Small Business Law for 9 years, handling both transactional and litigation matters. Her clients include R&B Artists Bilal and Olivia, NFL Superstar Ray Lewis, Fashion Powerhouse Harlem’s Fashion Row and Hirschfeld Properties, LLC.

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