Bump these Confederate statues celebrating slavery, white supremacy and “American history”! We have our own sheroes!

And with news that folks are sending around a petition that Missy Elliott deserves her own Monument in Charlottesville, we’ve been thinking what other African-American women deserve to have their legacies immortalized in stone in the South.

From Missy to Former First Lady Michelle Obama to Congresswoman Maxine Waters, here are 10 Black women who we need to have statues in their name NOW!

1. Black Girls Rock!

SXSW Keynote: Michelle Obama - 2016 SXSW Music, Film + Interactive Festival Source:Getty

Bump these Confederate statues celebrating slavery, white supremacy and “American history”! We have our own sheroes!

And with recent news that folks are sending around a petition that Missy Elliott deserves her own Monument in Charlottesville, we’ve been thinking what other African-American women deserve to have their legacies immortalized in stone in the South.

From Missy to Former First Lady Michelle Obama to Congresswoman Maxine Waters, here are 10 Black women who we need to have statues in their name NOW!

2. Missy Elliott

Bestival - Day 4 Source:Getty

The “Work It” rapper, born Melissa Arnette Elliott in the Virginia city of Portsmouth in 1971, and has gone on to become, according to Nielsen, the bestselling female rap album artist of all time. Werk!

3. Former First Lady Michelle Obama

Michelle Obama Delivers Final Speech At The White House Source:Getty

The first Black First Lady to live in this nation’s White House has been the country’s epitome of class, intelligence and beauty! She was also the most educated FLOTUS in American history, having graduated from Princeton and Harvard .Give her statue STAT!

4. Congresswoman Maxine Waters

2017 Black Girls Rock! Source:Getty

This California Democratic Congresswoman does more than help us “Reclaim our Time.” Yes, she has questioned #45 and his nonsense, but she also been an avid civil rights supporter and has had our back from the very beginning!

5. Harriet Tubman

The Retweet Harriet Tubman Source:GlobalGrind

Freedom fighter, Union spy and American abolitionist, Harriet Tubman freed almost 70 enslaved Blacks during her reign as guiding our ancestors to the
“Promised Land.” The icon will also be the face of the new $20 bill in 2020. We salute you!

6. Viola Davis

89th Annual Academy Awards - Press Room Source:Getty

One of the most celebrated and prolific Black actresses of our generation, Oscar, Golden Globe, Tony and Emmy winner, Viola Davis continues to wow the world with her incredible talent. This history maker is a true legend.

7. Ida Bell Wells-Barnett

Ida Bell Wells-Barnett, Leader in civil rights Source:Getty

Before there was Black Lives Matter, there was Ida B. The anti-lynching journalist was an outspoken advocate for women’s suffrage, feminist issues and the violence against Black folks in America during the early 20th century.

8. Sojourner Truth

Sojourner Truth, African American abolitionist and champion of women's rights. Born into slavery as Isabella Baumfree (1797-1883) she escaped to freedom in 1826. Changed her name in 1843. Source:Getty

Giving us “Ain’t I A Woman,” the embodiment of the womanist movement, Sojourner Truth was a former enslaved person who fought hard for the right for ALL Black people to have the right to vote and was a staunch abolitionist. She is definitely our Queen!

9. Serena Williams

Glamour's 25th Anniversary Women Of The Year Awards Source:Getty

We can no longer debate that the tennis icon Serena Williams is the greatest athlete of all time! The 23-Grand Slam winner has aced all the competition during her 20-plus year career. She has proven that she is the GOAT!

10. Rosa Parks

Rosa Parks On Bus Source:Getty

Rosa Parks more than the icon who gave up her seat on a racially segregated Montgomery bus. She also was an avid advocate in Detroit for issues surrounding housing, political prisoners and Black college students’ right to have a seat at the table.

11. Shirley Chisholm

Shirley Chisholm Gives the Victory Sign Source:Getty

“Unbossed and Unbothered,” the first Black woman elected to U.S. Congress was also the first Black person to run for a major party’s Presidential nomination. She may not have not have won, but she set the standard for progressive politics in the country.

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